Wednesday, 24 October 2007

I Now Pronounce You Cock McBalls & Dick Buttkiss...

I have to admit, as soon as I saw the gimmick-laden trailer for "I Now Pronounce You Chuck & Larry" I figured it'd be the usual Hollywood PG-13 dumb-fuck-yuck-fest, and initially (upon viewing) I was starting to think this was indeed the case ... however, I was proved wrong, well ... partly anyway.

It is indeed PG-13 fodder, but it's good PG-13 fodder. It's not the best film of it's kind, nor is it the worst. It's solid all round is what I'm saying.

The downside to the film does have to be certain wide-of-the-mark gags, they're not overly offensive - no doubt restrained by the PG-13 rating - but they're not exactly classy. The obese man trapped in a burning building, and the freaky Oriental priest dropping "L's for R's" left-right-and-centre. They seem like unnecessarily cheap gags is what I'm trying to say.

However, where the film does hold merit is in it's heart. Yes, there are plenty of gay jokes tossed into the mix, but it's that kind of gentle, 'having fun with it from a heterosexual perspective' sort of banter that many men engage in anyways. This is completely distinct and separate from the glances at homophobia in the film (most notably the gay-bashing protestors and their violent-intent-doused use of "faggot", as opposed to Adam Sandler's use of the same term in a 'gentle & confused, colloquial, raving-hetero manner' early on in the film.

The homophobic issue is looked at further with their fellow Firemen buddies who all panic at their friends' apparent gayness - the shower scene with slow-motion-soap-dropping actually becoming quite funny, in a 'mock morons who think all gay people want to shag them' sort of way. Indeed, they even hint at the assertions that some idiots have that gay people are peadophiles, an issue which is dropped quickly, but dealt with in that Larry is utterly baffled by the issue - because, after all, it is incomprehensible.

The film certainly has an air of "lol, gay jokes are funnee, har-har" about it, but to be honest - what is so wrong with that? As long as the intent is just to have a bit of fun, and not invoke violence, then who cares? Because ultimately - who gives a shit if you are straight/gay/bi/whatever-the-hell ... as I like to say, if you're a good person, then that's all you need. This brings me to an assertion I continue to maintain - I'd love to see a comedy about heterosexuals written from a gay perspective. Essentially reversing the roles we commonly see. Instead of fair-fun in the direction of gays, have fair-fun in the direction of straights. I think it's an untapped slice of fried gold, to be honest.

Now, I couldn't wait much longer, but yes - Jessica Biel is freaking smoking hot as lava in this film. It just has to be said...*goes off to dribble somewhere distractedly*

Well, now that that has been put out the way, back to the film itself. I can certainly understand why this movie was greenlit, while fun-gay-jokes do make good entertainment (as I'm sure fun-straight-jokes would if someone would pluck up the balls to "do different" for a change) - but it's the whole New York Fire Department angle. 9/11 is addressed subtly through the comradeship of the men themselves, brief but powerful mention made of their fallen comrades, and indeed the good-luck-charm-phrase that Chuck & Larry share. It does actually hold the power to drop some emotional moments, especially when the death of Larry's wife is addressed.

Ultimately, it's not as I'd expected it to be, and it's certainly not mocking or exploitative of gay people at all - it merely has fun with being gay and the conceptions of said team preference. Again, a reversal of this humour would be great to see and continue to render us all equal. Everybody should be open and up for a bit of fun at their own expense (albeit a small price in actuality), rather than the nannying "oh you can't touch this-this-and-this with a barge pole" sensibility of the now-stupid political correctness movement, something which did it's good and was then rendered abused & damaging long ago.

Back on track, and off of my soap box, "I Now Pronounce You Chuck & Larry" is actually far better than initial thoughts perceived, it's not superb, but it's solid and actually displays some true heart and depth of conscience ... something which more PG-13 fare could use these days.

No comments: